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Mathematics

Our Curriculum Intent for Mathematics.

At Hullavington we provide a maths' curriculum that supports and develops learning – a curriculum that results in the acquisition of knowledge and skills.  This is applicable across all strands of the mathematics curriculum matching the expectations set out in the National Curriculum; thus enabling all children to reach their full potential and setting strong foundations for their future education.  We provide opportunities across all curricular areas for development and implementation of mathematical skills and concepts, to allow maths to be used in all areas of the school curriculum and to apply their knowledge in a variety of subjects and differing scenarios.  This curriculum develops a life-long love of maths for all children. We intend to develop a love of maths through making learning meaningful and relevant to their lives.  Cross-curricular opportunities will enhance this and give maths meaning and relevance enabling children to know more, remember more and understand more.  

Maths in the Early Years Foundation Stage

Maths is one of the four specific areas within the Early Years Stage Foundation (EYFS). Each specific area is divided into Early Learning Goals, for maths these are:

  • Numbers - children learn to count and the value of numbers, higher and lower. These skills support them to solve problems, use money and calculate more or less.
  • Shape, Space and Measure - these skills support children to understand size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money and compare quantities, objects and solve problems.

Children learn about maths through play and their daily experiences. And the more meaningful to them and hands on it is, the better.  This includes: during snack time; through stories, rhymes and games; and through physical play.

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Key Stage 1, Years 1 and 2

The principal focus of mathematics teaching in key stage 1 is to ensure that pupils develop confidence and mental fluency with whole numbers, counting and place value.  This involves working with numerals, words and the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division). 

At this stage, children may be using practical resources to support their learning and these might include number lines, hundred squares, Numicon, cubes, etc. Pupils are developing their ability to recognise, describe, draw, compare and sort different shapes and use the related vocabulary.  They are using a range of measures to describe and compare different quantities such as length, mass, capacity/volume, time and money. 

By the end of year 2, pupils should know the number bonds to 20 and be precise in using and understanding place value.

Lower Key Stage 2, Years 3 and 4

The principal focus of mathematics teaching in key stage 1 is to ensure that pupils develop confidence and mental fluency with whole numbers, counting and place value.  This involves working with numerals, words and the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division). 

At this stage, children may be using practical resources to support their learning and these might include number lines, hundred squares, Numicon, cubes, etc. Pupils are developing their ability to recognise, describe, draw, compare and sort different shapes and use the related vocabulary.  They are using a range of measures to describe and compare different quantities such as length, mass, capacity/volume, time and money. 

By the end of year 2, pupils should know the number bonds to 20 and be precise in using and understanding place value.

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Upper Key Stage 2, Years 5 and 6

In upper key stage 2, pupils extend their understanding of the number system and place value to include larger integers. They make connections between multiplication and division, fractions, decimals, percentages and ratio.

Pupils are developing their ability to solve a wider range of problems, including increasingly complex properties of numbers and arithmetic, and problems demanding efficient written and mental methods of calculation. They are introduced to the language of algebra as a means for solving a variety of problems. Teaching in geometry and measures consolidates and extends knowledge developed in number. Pupils classify shapes with increasingly complex geometric properties and they learn the vocabulary they need to describe them.

By the end of year 6, the aim is for pupils to be fluent in written methods for all four operations, including long multiplication and division, and in working with fractions, decimals and percentages.

Pupils should read, spell and pronounce mathematical vocabulary correctly.

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So, what type of things will be child be doing in maths?

Developing a sense of the size of a number and where it fits into the number system (place value).

  • Learning by heart number facts such as number bonds, multiplication tables and doubles and halves.
  • Using what they know by heart to figure out numbers mentally.
  • Learning to calculate accurately and efficiently, both mentally and on paper, drawing on a range of calculation strategies.
  • Understanding how to make sense of ‘real life’ maths problems, including those with money, and recognising the operations needed to solve them.
  • Explaining their methods and reasoning using correct mathematical vocabulary.
  • Judging whether their answers are reasonable and have strategies for checking them where necessary.
  • Learning units for measuring and how to make sensible estimations of measures. Telling the time and understanding how to use a calendar.
  • Explaining and making predictions from numbers in graphs, diagrams, charts and tables.
  • Developing spatial awareness and an understanding of the properties of 2D and 3D shapes.
  • Understanding the importance of mathematics in everyday life and how to be confident in their approach to it.
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